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Snoring is an issue that affects nearly half of the male population and just over a quarter of the female population. While often not a problem when a person sleeps alone, it can become an issue whenever a bed partner is introduced and snoring becomes a nuisance.

When snoring becomes an issue, those affected by their partner’s snoring often scramble to find a cure. This often leads one to wonder if there is a permanent cure for snoring or if the snoring remedies being sold are merely a temporary solution.

You may have noticed that your snoring has increased as you have grown older. Perhaps your snoring has increased after you gained a few pounds. Age and weight gain are two major contributors to snoring but are not the only causes. Before trying out every snoring cure on the market, you may want to first consider what may be causing your snoring before taking corrective action. You may want to enlist the help of your physician to help you with this task.

Permanent Fixes For Snoring

In most cases, once one begins to snore, it typically worsens over time. However, for some, there are two permanent snoring”fixes” that are effective.

Weight Loss

While it’s true that not all who are overweight have a snoring problem, carrying a few extra pounds can cause snoring. This is especially true for those who carry extra fat around their neck. Maintaining one’s body weight becomes increasingly difficult as we age.  Before you know it, you have packed on 30 lbs and develop a snoring problem.

If this sounds familiar, altering your diet and adopting an exercise plan may be all that it takes to cure your snoring. Keep an eye on carbohydrates, fats, and calorie intake while incorporating exercise into your daily routine can steer you back on track. Losing weight around the neck relieves downward pressure which often causes an airway restriction. The airway is the site in which snoring and sleep apnea most commonly occur. Reducing fat lifts pressure off of the airway and allows free breathing which may result in the elimination of snoring.

Surgery

Another permanent cure for snoring is surgery. While most physicians will not recommend snoring as a permanent cure for snoring, it’s often necessary if there is a physical obstruction that is blocking the flow of air such as abnormally large tonsils. Snoring surgeries are often recommended in those who have excessive tissue that prevents the flow of air. An example would be enlarged tonsils, adenoids, nasal polyps, or abnormally shaped septums.

Snoring surgery should be reserved for those who are likely to benefit from the recovery can be long and painful.

Are Other Snoring Cures Available?

While weight loss and surgery are the only two “permanent cures” for snoring, there two other snoring cures that are also effective.

Positional Therapy

Sleeping on one’s side is often all that it takes to cure snoring. While sleeping on your back, the body relaxes and the jaw has a tendency to also relax and fall towards the airway which can result in an airway obstruction. When one sleeps on their side, the airway is less likely to be affected by the jaw as gravity prevents it from falling backward.

In order to remain on one’s side, a snore bumper must be put in place in order to prevent rollover. You can purchase a snore bumper for less than $100 or fabricate one yourself.

The downside to relying on positional therapy is that it’s not exactly a permanent solution as you will always require the use of a snore belt to prevent rollover onto your back.

Snoring Mouthguard

Another snoring cure that I prefer is the snoring mouthguard. As mentioned, the jaw tends to relax and fall backward as we sleep. A snoring mouthguard prevents the jaw from falling back while sleeping in any position. If you prefer to sleep on your back, a mouthguard may be helpful.

The mouthguard is placed inside of the mouth prior to falling asleep. They are typically custom molded to fit closely between the upper and lower teeth. As the body relaxes, the jaw is held forward and in place by the upper teeth.

Mouthguards have been in existence for several years now and are typically only available online. Here’s a resource that’s helpful if you decide to go with a mouthguard.

Mouthguards, while more effective than snore bumpers, still share the same downfall which is they must be used every night otherwise the snoring will return.

When It’s More Than Snoring

Snoring is an issue that affects millions of couples every night. While often considered just a bedroom nuisance, sometimes snoring can be a symptom of a more serious issue – sleep apnea.

If your partner notices that your breathing sometimes pauses or you wake up each morning feeling less than refreshed, this may be an indication of sleep apnea. If you experience any symptoms of sleep apnea, it’s important to first speak with your doctor before attempting to treat a snoring problem.

Sleep apnea often requires the use of an apparatus called a CPAP machine which assists with keeping the airway open as you sleep. They can perform a sleep study to confirm whether or not this will be necessary.

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Snoring is an issue that affects nearly half of the male population and just over a quarter of the female population. While often not a problem when a person sleeps alone, it can become an issue whenever a bed partner is introduced and snoring becomes a nuisance. When snoring becomes an issue, those affected by […] Read more

Tonsillectomy Overview

There are typically only a couple of reasons why your doctor would ever suggest tonsil removal, commonly known as a Tonsillectomy. Each year, over 500,000 Americans have their tonsils removed for one reason or another. One of these reasons may be due to chronic inflammation or infection of the tonsils.  Those who experience frequent tonsillitis may consider a tonsillectomy as a way to remedy this issue.

Another common reason why one may consider a tonsillectomy is if their physician has determined that their tonsils are oversized which can lead to issues with snoring or sleep apnea. Abnormally large tonsils can fall into the back of the throat and cause a partial or complete blockage of the airway. When a partial blockage occurs, the tonsils rattle around while breathing and generate the sound of snoring. In other cases, the tonsils completely block off the flow of air, causing an apneic episode which is when airflow stops momentarily, the body awakens and breathing resumes once again. Each episode can last for a few seconds to a minute or more. Most individuals with sleep apnea experience several apneic episodes each night.

Regardless of the reason, you may have been advised by your physician that a tonsillectomy is in your future.  There are several techniques that are commonly used to remove tonsils, some more popular than others.

In the past, the dissection and snare technique was used in which forceps, scissors, and a snare are used to remove the tonsils. Today electrocautery (electrosurgery) is far more common and is a method that uses electrical energy to separate tonsil tissue from surrounding tissue. The device used to cut the tonsils generates concentrated energy that produces heat up to 800° F in order to cut through tissue. The energy and heat cause cells to rupture and tissue vaporizes. One of the greatest benefits of using this method is the fact that the heat cauterizes the tissue and bleeding is minimized.

There are several other methods that are used such as radiofrequency ablation, thermal welding, and the carbon dioxide laser.

One method that has gained popularity in recent years is Coblation, a method that was discovered by accident in the 1990’s.

Coblation Tonsillectomy

Coblation Tonsillectomy

A Coblation Tonsillectomy is a type of technology that was introduced by  Hira V. Thapliyal and Philip E. Eggers in the mid 1990’s. They were in search of a method to unblock coronary arteries by use of electrosurgical energy. After realizing that their coblation wand could be used during surgeries such as tonsillectomies, they formed ArothoCare and began to market their product at the arthroscopy show in 1996.

The name Coblation can be broken down – Co, meaning controlled and blation which is derived from the word ablation, which means to reduce the size of something. A Coblation wand combines the use of a saline solution and radiofrequency to generate a plasma field.

What makes Coblation so unique is the fact that it generates very little heat. Unlike electrosurgery which generates heat upwards to 800° F, cobalation only reached around 175° F which is no hotter than a cup of coffee or tea.  As a result, the healthy tissue in which the tonsils are cut from does not sustain the heat damage that typically occurs with electrosurgery.

A Closer Look at a Coblation System

Taking a closer look, the coblation system consists of four parts – The RF generator, foot pedal, irrigation system and wand.

The RF generator creates radiofrequency signals that can be used for either coblation or cauterization, depending on which setting is used. The foot pedals allow the surgeon to choose between each mode.

The wand is the tool that’s used to perform the procedure. Wands can be switched out and are available in several different sizes depending upon the application. The wand contains both active and passive electrodes which interact with the flow of a saline solution which turns into ions and forms plasma. It’s the plasma that cuts through the tissue.

Is Coblation Really Better?

This leads us to the question of whether or not coblation is better than other surgical methods such as electrocautery. When this technology was initially released it was touted as a better way to perform a tonsillectomy because the low heat did not destroy healthy tissue. It’s said that as a result of using low heat, the patient experiences less pain and bleeding after the operation.  Ask anyone who has experienced tonsillectomy and they will tell you that the recovery period is not at all pleasant.

While many physicians believe that coblation is a safer, gentler method, a recent paper “Coblation versus other surgical techniques for tonsillectomy” suggests that there is little-supporting evidence showing this method to be superior. The paper examined 29 previous studies, concluding that there was not much evidence to support that the claims of coblation being a less painful procedure are true.

Dr. Melissa Ann Pynnonen, a professor in Michigan Medicine’s Department of Otolaryngology, believes that the marketing efforts by medical device companies have caused people to believe that coblation makes the procedure less painful.

In other words, regardless of the method used to remove your tonsils, swallowing is going to be painful for at least 14 days.

Alternative to Tonsillectomy 

Maybe you are thinking to yourself that a tonsillectomy doesn’t sound like something you would like to experience. Is there an alternative to having a Tonsillectomy? Actually, there is.

In the early 2000’s a new procedure was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Rather than removing your tonsils, Somnoplasty allows you to keep your tonsils in place while reducing their size. While this procedure can be helpful to those who experience snoring or sleep apnea, patients who experience frequent infections in their tonsils typically will not benefit.

The procedure involves inserting electrodes into the tonsils and delivering RF energy directly within the tonsils. These electrodes are very thin and needle-like. The needle/ electrode is insulated with the exception of the tip. The energy delivered selectively destroys tissue and causes the tonsils to shrink from within. While the tonsils will still be present, they will become much smaller which can prevent them from interfering with breathing and causing snoring or sleep apnea.

This is typically an outpatient surgery that is performed under local anesthesia. The procedure typically takes between 30-45 minutes from start to finish.

The benefit of having a Somnoplasty instead of Tonsillectomy is less pain and post-operation bleeding.

If you are suffering from snoring or sleep apnea and are considering a tonsillectomy, you may want to speak with your doctor about having a somnoplasty instead.

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Tonsillectomy Overview There are typically only a couple of reasons why your doctor would ever suggest tonsil removal, commonly known as a Tonsillectomy. Each year, over 500,000 Americans have their tonsils removed for one reason or another. One of these reasons may be due to chronic inflammation or infection of the tonsils.  Those who experience […] Read more

2 Star Rating

About SnoreCare Nose Vents

The Original SnoreCare Nose Vents are considered nasal dilators, meaning that they are designed to open up the nasal passages to promote better breathing and to eliminate snoring.

The Design  

Snorecare with storage case and retail packaging According to the manufacturer, the SnoreCare nose cones are made from a high quality, soft medical grade silicone that is BPA free.

The design of the SnoreCare is actually quite simple, consisting of two hollow cylinders that are joined together with a thin piece of silicone at the center. These nose vents are molded from one piece of silicone which makes them less likely to break or fall apart.

There doesn’t appear to be anything revolutionary about the design of the SnoreCare, as it appears similar in nature to other nose cones that I have tried in the past, although being made from silicone instead of a rigid plastic makes this product somewhat unique.

Since everyone has different size nasal passages, the SnoreCare is sold as a set for four. There are two sizes – “Small” and “Big” and the outer portion of the cone comes either ribbed or smooth, therefore you have the large ribbed, large smooth, small ribbed and small smooth sizes.  While the small and large sizes are self-explanatory, no explanation is given for the smooth vs ribbed cones. It’s likely that the ribbed version helps to keep the vents in place if they have a tendency to slide out.

While their website doesn’t indicate that a travel case is included, their Amazon listing does show a free travel case.

The Claim

Person writing the word claims The claim that SnoreCare makes is quite simple – it will stop your snoring, but the question is how does it stop snoring? They do offer an explanation.

According to the manufacturer’s product description, they state that snoring is caused by a narrowing of the nasal passages.  They further explain that their product helps by strengthening and expanding the nasal passages. They imply that opening and expanding the nasal passages prevents obstruction in the throat which causes snoring.

I must admit that I was a bit confused after reading this claim. At first, it was mentioned that snoring is caused by narrowing of the nasal passages, which in itself can be true in some cases. Subsequently, they suggest that by opening the nasal passages with the SnoreCare, this prevents obstruction in the throat which is the cause of snoring. This leaves me wondering exactly how this product, which is inserted into the nasal cavities, clears obstruction in the throat.

Additionally, they state that their product is better than all other nasal dilators or mouthguards on the market.

The Cost

Price tag with word Price??The SnoreCare website has their product listed at $16.95 plus the cost of shipping and taxes. When I tried to place an order I was unable to do so because the checkout was disabled.

Shopping around, I found them for sale on Amazon for $24.95 which included free shipping with my prime membership. While slightly more expensive than ordering directly from their website, I was able to avoid paying for shipping because it was an Amazon Prime item and Amazon did not collect the tax. The total order price to my doorstep was $24.95.

SnoreCare vs Nasal Strips

SnoreCare mentions that their product is “3 times better than nasal strips”. Further explanation as to how this statistic was derived or exactly what “better” implies would be helpful.

Nasal strips fit on the outside of the nose and adhere to the surface of the skin. Using a flexible band which spans across the bridge of the nose and creates a leverage point, the nasal passages are lifted opened to provide better airflow.

SnoreCare also opens the nasal passages, only it opens the air passages from the inside.

One feature that makes the SnoreCare more desirable than nasal strips is the fact that unlike nasal strips, they can be cleaned and are reused. Nasal strips can be quite expensive, with a 26 day supply costing around $9.00.  This equates to over $100 per year. SnoreCare cost $25 and can be reused over and over.  It’s easy to see how purchasing the SnoreCare once and reusing offers a savings advantage.

Comparing the two side-by-side, the SnoreCare offers a product that is far less expensive than nasal strips, but aside from this fact, there doesn’t seem to be any evidence that one product outperforms the other.

Amazon Reviews

When examining their listing, the first thing that I noticed that it was the #1 Best Seller in Snore Reducing Aides and was “Amazons Choice”. Both badges indicate that there’s a strong buyer presence with this product.

Before buying any product, I always take a look at the Amazon reviews, which at the time of this writing there were an impressive 6,800 reviews posted. 87% of the reviews left were either 4 or 5 star while the remaining 13% were 3, 2, or 1 star.

While these stats may seem impressive, it’s always best to read each review carefully to make your own determination.

My Experience With SnoreCare

Person looking at word "review" under magnifying glassThe SnoreCare nose vents arrived as a set of four as promised along with a travel case. The SnoreCare was made from a soft silicone-like material and seemed to be of good quality.

I started off by washing each nose cone under warm water. I began with the smooth textured small size and noticed that it was far too large for my nostrils. I then switched to the ribbed textured small size which fit much better.

At first, the feeling of having two cones inserted into my nose was somewhat awkward, although this was something that I quickly became accustomed to after using them for a couple nights. After inserting, I noticed that my nostrils felt open and I was able to breathe freely and quite well. I went to bed with the SnoreCare nose cones that night to give them a test run.

In the morning I noticed that the ribbed nose cones remained in place throughout the night so I decided to test out the smooth cones which performed equally as well. It did, however, seem as though the smooth cones were more comfortable overall.

The second night I turned on my snore app and recorded throughout the night. The results – I was unable to see any improvement in snoring with this product.

I repeated this test the second night and found the results to be the same.

Will SnoreCare Nasal Dilator Work For You?

The manufacturer claims that snoring is caused by the narrowing of nasal passages, but is this true? While I tend to avoid generalized statements, it’s true that snoring most often comes as a result of a collapsed airway. The site in which often collapses is in the neck area, far away from the nasal cavities. While snoring is occasionally caused by blocked nasal passages, this is rarely the case. In most instances, snoring originates from a partially obstructed airway. This has scientifically proven several times.

As we age, the muscles surrounding the airway become weak and begin to fail.  When we sleep, the jaw relaxes and falls towards the throat. A combination of relaxed jaw and weak muscles surrounding the airway creates a perfect storm which causes a restriction of the airway. This restriction is often more pronounced in those who are overweight or use alcohol prior to going to sleep.

So what’s the solution? While the SnoreCare may be worth giving a try, you will likely need a product that attacks the most common issue at the source which is the airway in the neck region. For this, you will need a mandibular advancement device, better known as a snoring mouthpiece.

There are several designs from a number of different manufacturers available. A great place to start is by reading several reviews on this site. Here’s a list of several mouthpieces that I have tried.

 

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☆☆☆☆☆ 2 Star Rating About SnoreCare Nose Vents The Original SnoreCare Nose Vents are considered nasal dilators, meaning that they are designed to open up the nasal passages to promote better breathing and to eliminate snoring. The Design   According to the manufacturer, the SnoreCare nose cones are made from a high quality, soft medical grade […] Read more

What is Long Sleeping?

Oversleeping, long sleeping, sleeping too much, hypersomnia  – no matter what you call it, we are referring to the same condition. It comes down to knowing whether you are getting too much or too little sleep every night.

Depending on who you ask, most experts agree that the ideal amount of sleep that you should get each night is between 7 to 9 hours. The amount of sleep that you get each night will often vary somewhat depending upon age. Regularly sleeping more than 9 hours may indicate that you have an underlying health issue, although this is not always the case.

If you are sleeping more than 9 hours each night, you may want to begin by taking a look at your lifestyle.

Considerations For Long Sleepers 

There are several questions that you should ask yourself when investigating your sleeping habits. Do you consume an excessive amount of alcohol before going to bed? Do you take sedatives, prescription medication, or other drugs that may disrupt your sleep and cause you to stay in the bed longer? What about caffeinated beverages before bed? All of these items may cause you to sleep in excess.

Take a look at your dietary and exercise habits. Poor diet along with lack of exercise will leave you feeling sluggish and tired which may cause you to sleep in excess.

Refrain from bad habits that may disrupt sleep, eat a balanced diet and exercise. If nothing else, making these changes will have a positive impact on your health in general.

What Else Causes Over Sleeping

There are several possible causes of oversleeping other than lifestyle choices. For this reason, it’s important that you first speak with your doctor who can help you to determine the cause of excessive sleeping.

One cause may be depression. While depression is more often linked to insomnia, it can also cause one to oversleep. Your doctor can help you to determine if depression is contributing to oversleeping. Depression can be treated using a combination of prescription medication and speaking with a therapist.

Another condition, hypothyroidism,  affects about five percent of the population and is characterized by an under-active thyroid. The thyroid plays a major roll in how the body functions because it controls the way that the body uses energy. When it malfunctions, this can leave you feeling constantly tired which will cause you to sleep more than normal. Your doctor can check your thyroid function and may prescribe medication if he or she finds an issue.

How do you feel upon rising after getting 9+ hours of sleep? Do you feel refreshed and ready to conquer the day or do you still feel tired, sluggish and could continue to sleep? If you still feel tired even after getting more than the recommended amount of sleep, this may be caused by a sleep disorder or breathing-related sleep disorder such as obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Do you snore? Has your partner noticed pauses in your breathing? Snoring, pauses in breathing, and daytime tiredness are all classic signs of obstructive sleep apnea.

You may be surprised to hear that over 25 million adults in America suffer from sleep apnea. What’s even more surprising is the majority of sufferers are unaware of their condition. Untreated sleep apnea can lead to high blood pressure, heart attack, and stroke among several other serious conditions. Sleep apnea occurs when the airway collapses while asleep and prevents breathing. When breathing ceases, your body will be startled awake so that breathing can resume. This cycle continues several times through the night which prevents you from getting a restful nights sleep. In most cases, the person will not recall waking up several times throughout the night.

Fortunately, treating OSA is typically an easy task. Most doctors will first diagnose sleep apnea by having their patient conduct a sleep study which can be completed in a lab or at home. Lab studies are typically more comprehensive while at home sleep studies usually provide enough information to make a diagnosis. At home studies are often a more cost-effective diagnosing tool because they are self-administered with fairly simple equipment which monitors heart rate, breathing, O2 levels, and such.

If your doctor determines that sleep apnea is present, they will likely prescribe a Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) machine which blows air into your airway throughout the night using a tube and mask to prevent your airway from collapsing. Since obstructive sleep apnea is often caused by being overweight, if you are overweight, your doctor may suggest losing a few pounds as a way to prevent sleep apnea from occurring.

Other treatment options include a mandibular advancement device which holds the jaw forward and prevents airway collapse. These devices are often referred to as oral appliances and can be custom made by your dentist. Tongue stabilizing devices (TSD) can be purchased online and offer a one-size-fits-all solution to sleep apnea. Be sure to first speak with your doctor before treating sleep apnea with any product that can be purchased on the internet.

When Oversleeping Isn’t Normal

Before drawing any conclusions, it’s important to note that some people simply require more sleep than others and do not have a health condition that’s causing their excessive sleeping. While it’s easy to simply write off excessive sleeping as “normal”, you should take a closer look at what may be going on.

Begin by examining the lifestyle choices that you make each day. While it’s never easy to alter habits, you may find that changing a few habits will make a difference. Just to be sure, you should also speak with your physician to discuss the possibility of another condition that’s causing long sleeping.

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What is Long Sleeping? Oversleeping, long sleeping, sleeping too much, hypersomnia  – no matter what you call it, we are referring to the same condition. It comes down to knowing whether you are getting too much or too little sleep every night. Depending on who you ask, most experts agree that the ideal amount of […] Read more

How Common Is Snoring?

When a person discovers that they snore, the first question that they are likely to ask is whether or not snoring is normal.

It’s true that most people snore to some extent. While one person’s snoring may resemble a lumberjack cutting down a tree, another’s snoring may only be heard as an occasional snort or heavy breathing. The fact of the matter is that most people are not completely silent while they are asleep.

When is Snoring Abnormal?

At what point do you go from normal snoring to having a problem? There are two instances where snoring can become an issue.

The first instance is where your snoring becomes loud and intense enough to disturb your partner’s sleep. When a bed partner complains about their other half’s snoring, the snorer will often dismiss the issue and think nothing of it. The partner who has to sleep next to the snorer ends up losing sleep which can have an effect on their level of energy and mood during the day. While snoring may seem like such a harmless act, it has actually been known to cause marital issues.

The other instance is where there is a possible presence of sleep apnea. Does your partner notice that you momentarily stop breathing while asleep or gasp for air? Do you wake up with headaches or wake up tired? Do you have high blood pressure or diabetes? Do you experience difficulty trying to concentrate during the day? If you experience any of these symptoms, there is a possibility that your snoring is linked to sleep apnea which is a serious condition that can wreak havoc on your health.

What To Do When Snoring Is Abnormal

When snoring becomes abnormal, you do have several options to correct the issue.

Start out by thinking about the reason behind your snoring. Often times, snoring is brought upon us by lifestyle choices. For instance, if you are carrying around extra fat (particularly in the neck area) your likelihood of snoring will increase. Adopt healthier eating habits and try to shed a few pounds. In most cases, those who are overweight find that they are able to either eliminate their snoring or greatly reduce it by losing weight.

Other times, alcohol and or sedative use before bed can be blamed for a snoring problem. If you enjoy a drink or two before bed, try to limit your last drink to 4 hours before bed so that it does it does not interfere with your sleep. Alcohol relaxes the body and will cause the airway to relax which can restrict airflow and cause snoring.

You may also want to consider changing your sleeping position if you tend to sleep on your back. Sleeping on your back allows gravity to exert a force on your airway which causes snoring. Instead of sleeping on your back, try sleeping on your side. Doing so will shift airway tissue and prevent airway blockage. This practice is referred to as positional therapy.

If you are still experiencing snoring after trying these suggestions, you may want to consider the use of an oral appliance, better known as a snoring mouthpiece. Snoring mouthpieces are extremely effective and can be purchased on the internet at a cost between $60 to $100. This website contains a lot of great information and is helpful.

There are a number of other snoring aids that can assist with a snoring problem. Manufacturers of herbal remedies, throat sprays, nasal strips, chin straps, and nose cones all make promises that their products work, however, few of these products offer scientific evidence that they actually work. Oral appliance therapy, the snoring mouthpiece, has been studied and proven effective for over thirty years now.

Snoring and Sleep Apnea

A snoring problem can often be addressed by following the mentioned suggestions, but what should you do if you suspect that your snoring is related to sleep apnea? If you snore and exhibit any of the symptoms mentioned above such as pauses in breathing, daytime sleepiness, difficulty concentrating, etc., it’s absolutely necessary that you visit a physician for a further evaluation. It is likely that they will have you complete a sleep study which will measure blood-oxygen levels, brain activity, breathing, and a number of other functions while you sleep. In the past, sleep studies were only conducted in a sleep lab. Today, some doctors will prescribe an at-home sleep study which can be conducted from the comfort of your home.

What’s the difference between a lab study and an at home study? With a lab study, you will be connected to dozens of different sensors and observed throughout the night by a lab technician. The at-home version uses a far less sophisticated system which you connect up at home before going to bed. A sleep study that is conducted in a laboratory paints a much more detailed picture when it comes to determining exactly what’s going on and whether or not you are getting restful sleep at night while the at home gives a glimpse of your sleeping habits. Some physicians argue that an at home test is not adequate while others believe that it’s a low-cost screening tool that’s more comfortable and convenient for their patients. If you are interested, you can ask your physician about an at-home test although they may or may not allow one.

Snoring VS Sleep Apnea

Both snoring and sleep apnea are two issues that you will want to address. While snoring can be a nuisance that will need to eventually be addressed, sleep apnea is far more serious and can become life-threatening as the condition drastically increases your risk of stroke or heart attack. Sleep apnea cannot be self-treated while benign snoring can often be addressed with the assistance of an aid such as a snoring mouthpiece. If you question whether your snoring is related to sleep apnea, contact your physician for further screening.

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How Common Is Snoring? When a person discovers that they snore, the first question that they are likely to ask is whether or not snoring is normal. It’s true that most people snore to some extent. While one person’s snoring may resemble a lumberjack cutting down a tree, another’s snoring may only be heard as […] Read more

About Nightlase Treatment

For years, the CPAP and Oral Appliance have ruled when it comes to treating snoring and sleep apnea. Now, newer laser snoring technology is capturing the attention of those who are seeking treatment. More specifically, we are talking about Nightlase Lightwalker laser by Fotona. Fotona has been working in the laser industry for over 50 years and is a world leader in medical lasers. In the past, this type of technology was only used to reduce the appearance of wrinkles or for vaginal rejuvenation. Only recently has this type of laser treatment been approved for oral use.

How Does It Work?

Before and After NightLase Treatment

It’s a common misconception that snoring originates from the nose. Many people believe snoring is related to the shape of their nose or due to an injury to the nose earlier in life. While nasal issues can cause snoring, this is typically not the area in which snoring comes from.

In most cases, snoring originates in the throat and is caused by parapharyngeal tissue that have become loose due to aging. As with other areas of our body, aging takes its toll and muscles lose tone and begin to sag. When this occurs in the pharynx area, the airway becomes restricted as air tries to pass by. As air moves past this restriction it forces these airway tissues to collide with each other. The collision of parapharyngeal tissue generates the sound of snoring. In essence, the sound of snoring is simply created by old worn and sagging airway tissues smacking against each other.

You may be wondering why the sound of snoring doesn’t exist when you are awake. There’s actually a very simple explanation for this. While awake, the airway is stimulated which keeps it tight. As you fall asleep, muscles in the body begin to relax, including those in the airway. The sound of snoring becomes more pronounced when alcohol and sedatives are use before bed. This explains why your wife often complains about heavy snoring after you drink alcohol and then fall asleep.

NightLase procedure

Mandibular Advancement Devices are often prescribed to hold the jaw forward and tighten these loose muscles. The Nightlase effectively tightens the area around the soft palate by use of their patented Lightwalker dental laser that helps to simulate the creation of new elastic collagen which does not sag and interfere with breathing as you sleep.

The procedure is non-invasive, requires no anesthetics and only takes a few minutes to complete and is typically conducted within your dentist’s office. Your dentist will carefully run the Lightwalker laser around the uvula area. This laser uses Er:YAG wavelengths to shrink and tighten the tissue. During the procedure, you may feel a slight warming sensation and afterward, your throat may become slightly scratchy for perhaps a day or so. Since the laser does not actually cut the tissue there’s no stitching or concerns of infection.

After the initial procedure, you will need to return two more times over the next six weeks for another treatment. Treatments are typically spaced out three weeks apart and involve another pass of the laser.

Is NightLase A Permanent Solution?

Nightlase rejuvenates old and weakened tissue. As we progressively age, these tissues will eventually lose elasticity once again and snoring will reemerge. Due to the fact that aging is an ongoing process, the Lightlase is not a permanent solution. You will need to go in for “touch-up” procedures every six to eighteen months and require a quick office visit.

NightLase Effectiveness

How effective is the NightLase procedure? It’s estimated that up to 80% of patients report success in reducing the frequency and intensity of snoring. While 80% may not seem overly promising, statistically speaking, it’s one of the most effective snoring solutions available.

How much does the NightLase Treatment Cost?

Using NightLase to treat your snoring may be less costly than you think. While the cost of laser treatment will vary depending upon region as well as the office performing the procedure, we can offer a ballpark figure which can help you decide if this treatment option is worth the cost.

In general, most physicians are going to charge a fee for an initial consultation. This fee may be somewhere between $200 and $300. The actual procedure costs approximately $500 per visit/ treatment. Since three initial treatments are expected, you can expect the total cost to be somewhere around $1,700 – $1,800 depending on location and choice of doctor. You should also consider the cost of touch up visits every year or so which will cost about $500 per visit.  Fortunately, touch-ups are typically only one visit.

Is It Worth The Cost?

With an 80% success rate, NightLase seems to be one of the more effective snoring solutions available. Being non-invasive and not causing any permanent changes in the structure of the airway are two desirable features of this procedure compared to surgeries that are permanent and can cause complications later down the road. With the NightLase, you will not be dependent on the nightly use of oral appliances.

As you can see, there are several benefits associated with choosing the NightLase treatment for your snoring. The initial cost and ongoing costs may determine whether or not a person chooses this treatment option. For some, the price tag may be cost prohibitive while others may not have an issue paying the price.

If you are on the fence due to the cost of the procedure, you may want to consider if there are any financing options available which will make the cost more manageable.

If the cost will put a strain on your budget, you may want to consider trying out an oral appliance, also known as a “snoring mouthpiece”.  Several snoring mouthpieces are over 80% effective and most cost well under $100, which is a more budget-friendly option. I have been an oral appliance proponent for several years now and have tested several of them.

Deciding if NightLase if worth the cost is a personal decision that should be made while considering if the procedure fits into your budget.

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About Nightlase Treatment For years, the CPAP and Oral Appliance have ruled when it comes to treating snoring and sleep apnea. Now, newer laser snoring technology is capturing the attention of those who are seeking treatment. More specifically, we are talking about Nightlase Lightwalker laser by Fotona. Fotona has been working in the laser industry […] Read more

The Relationship Between Snoring and Humidity

Dealing with a snoring problem is never easy.  In order to cure a snoring problem, the first step is to identify exactly what is causing your snoring. Identifying the cause of snoring can often require a bit of trial and error.

You may have heard that a humidifier can help to ease a snoring problem, which can be true. In low humidity conditions, the nasal passages can become dry, irritated, and inflamed which can restrict the flow of air and may contribute to snoring. Increasing humidity levels by running a humidifier can help to create an environment that soothes your nasal passages and prevents snoring.

If you suspect that low humidity is the cause of your snoring, you should first measure humidity levels using a hygrometer to determine exactly where the humidity levels fall within your home. If the humidity in your home is lower than acceptable, adding humidity to the air will make breathing more comfortable and may even cure your snoring problem.

What exactly is an acceptable level of humidity? In general, the lower the outdoor temperature, the lower the humidity should be indoors.

When outdoor temperatures exceed 50˚ F, humidity levels shouldn’t exceed 50%. With outdoor temperatures between 20 ˚ F – 49˚ F,  humidity should remain around 40 %.  As temperatures drop, lower humidity levels become acceptable.

Before increasing the humidity levels in your home, keep in mind that mold thrives in humidity conditions that are greater than 60%. Because of this, you should constantly monitor the humidity levels in your home and choose a humidifier that uses a humidistat which cycles the humidifier on and off based on humidity levels. By allowing humidity levels to exceed 60%, you can create unhealthy conditions which may cause more harm than good.

How To Choose A Humidifier for Snoring?

If after you measure the humidity levels in your home you determine you could benefit from a little extra moisture in the air, you can purchase a humidifier which will add water vapor to the air. Before deciding which type of system to go with, you will have a bit of research to do.

First, you may want to consider whether to go with a portable unit or a whole house unit that’s installed within your HVAC air delivery system. Portable units are generally less expensive and can be set up in just a few minutes. You simply unpack it, add water and plug it into an outlet. These units have the limitation of only being able to service a room or two.

As an alternative, you can have a whole-house humidifier installed in your HVAC duct system which receives a water supply from your plumbing that wets a honeycomb-like filter. As air blows past the filter, water molecules are captured and delivered throughout the home. As you may have guessed, whole-house furnace humidifiers can be more costly in comparison to a portable unit. There are several different whole-house brands to choose from but Aprilaire is one of the more popular manufacturers. Such a unit can be purchased for around $200 plus the cost of installation.

Since you are only trying to determine if low humidity is contributing to your snoring, a portable unit should get the job done. If you find that the addition of moisture in the air is helping with your snoring, you can always upgrade to a whole-house humidifier.

Focusing on portable units, there are three basic types of humidifiers – warm mist, cool mist, and ultrasonic.

As the name implies, warm mist humidifiers release warm steam into the air which is visible. This type of humidifier releases a little bit of heat which can help to make the room a slight bit warmer than the rest of the house.

Cool mist humidifiers release water vapor into the air that is cool as opposed to warm. While steam is not visible, moisture is still added to the air.  Cool mist humidifiers typically use filters to remove contaminants from the air.  Cool mist humidifiers generally operate more quietly in comparison to warm mist humidifiers.

The third type of humidifier, ultrasonic, contains a diaphragm which vibrates and creates little water droplets which are released into the air using forced air. These also operate very quietly in comparison to the warm mist humidifiers.

Other Considerations When Choosing A Humidifier 

In addition to choosing the type of humidifier, there are also several other considerations that you should keep in mind.

First, you will want to consider the size of the room that you are trying to add humidity to. Some humidifiers will only work in smaller rooms +-100 sqft while others are designed for medium-size rooms greater than 100 sqft. Then there are ones that can handle large rooms, greater than 1000 sqft in size.

Next, decide if you would like a unit that contains a humidistat. As mentioned, a humidistat monitors humidity levels and will cycle your humidifier on and off in order to maintain a certain level of humidity. Since constantly monitoring humidity and turning a humidifier off and back on can be a time-consuming task,  I would highly recommend choosing a humidifier that contains a humidistat.

Another consideration that’s overlooked is ease of cleaning and maintenance. All humidifiers must be cleaned and maintained on a regular schedule. Failure to do so can allow it to harbor harmful bacteria and germs. Consider a humidifier that is easy to take apart and access all of the areas that need to be cleaned. In general, the fewer parts to clean, the better.

Unless you use distilled water, your humidifier will build up a white powder over time. This white powder is actually a mineral residue that’s typically in your water. Once the liquid evaporates, a chalky white mineral residue remains. These mineral deposits will need to be removed.

Cost is a consideration that you will also want to weigh. Warm and cool steam humidifiers are generally less expensive in comparison to the ultrasonic humidifiers. The cost will also vary from one manufacturer to another.

 

Finally, consider whether or not a timer is important to you. If you would like your humidifier to only run at night while you are asleep, this is a feature that you may want to consider.

Students at the University of Texas at El Paso researched the benefits of having a humidifier installed in your home and found that there are several health benefits besides preventing and stopping snoring which include lower heating costs, smoother skin, and the filtration of toxins in the air.

When Humidity Is Not The Problem

Perhaps you have checked your humidity levels and found them to be adequate. Maybe you have tried using a humidifier and found that it did not do anything to help your snoring problem.

The truth is, while lack of humidity can sometimes cause snoring, there are other underlying issues that are far more common contributors to snoring. The single most common problem is lack of tone in the muscles surrounding the throat.

As we age, the muscles around the airway become weak and lose tone. This is especially true in those who are carrying a few extra pounds of weight. A loose airway easily collapses and restricts the airway while you are asleep. While breathing, air moves past this restricted area and causes the airway tissue to flap around. This is what typically generates the sound of snoring.

So what’s the solution? How do you tighten the muscles in the airway? While there are a few exercises that you can do such as playing the Didgeridoo, there are more practical and less expensive ways to tighten the airway and prevent snoring. The device that I am talking about here is called a snoring mouthpiece and millions of people have found success using one.

A snoring mouthpiece, in essence, is a mandibular advancement device (MAD) which resembles an athletic mouth guard and is inserted into the mouth prior to going to bed. The mouthpiece actually holds the jaw forward which tightens the airway and prevents the vibration of airway tissues. In the past, MADs were only prescribed by doctors and cost well over $1,000.  Today they are available to nearly anyone and can be acquired for less than $100.  You can find more information on all of the available snoring mouthpieces here.

 

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The Relationship Between Snoring and Humidity Dealing with a snoring problem is never easy.  In order to cure a snoring problem, the first step is to identify exactly what is causing your snoring. Identifying the cause of snoring can often require a bit of trial and error. You may have heard that a humidifier can […] Read more

Several years ago, I heard about how Mandibular Advancement Devices can help with a snoring problem. I quickly realized that owning a custom-made mouthpiece that’s created by a dentist was cost prohibitive. This led me to search for a Do-It-Yourself type guard and it wasn’t long before I discovered that a self-molded product does, in fact, exist and at a fraction of the cost of one found at the dentist’s office.

Before spending the $60 or even $100 on a mouthpiece, I wondered whether a snoring mouthpiece would work for me. After a few minutes of research, I came across a couple suggested tests that can be used to help determine if a mouthpiece is a viable solution to a snoring problem.

The Snoring Mouthpiece Test

There are two different types of mouthpieces that are available – MAD’s and TSD’s. Here are a couple quick tests that you can try at home to help determine if either product will work for you.

The Tongue Test

The tongue test is a great way to tell if a Tongue Stabilizing Device (TSD) may be a good fit.

Start by laying on your back and relaxing. Once in a relaxed state, recreate the sound of snoring as if you were sound asleep. Next, stick out your tongue just past your front teeth and continue to create the sound of snoring. While transitioning between making the snoring sound with your tongue in and out, be sure not to spend any more or any less effort in doing so.

If you noticed that the sound of snoring was greatly reduced or even eliminated with your tongue out, you may find that a snoring mouthpiece will work for you. This test demonstrates how a TSD could help, it’s very likely that a MAD will also be effective.

The Jaw Advancement Test

Another simple test that you can perform at home is the jaw advancement test which simulates the action of a Mandibular Advancement Device (MAD). A MAD is another type of snoring mouthpiece that closely resembles what you would find at a dentist’s office.

This test is performed in a similar fashion as the tongue test. You simply lay on back, relax, and begin to make the snoring sound. Continue doing so for a few breath cycles and without changing your breathing, move your jaw slightly forward and take notice of any change in the sound of snoring. If you notice a significant improvement in your snoring, chances are a jaw advancing snoring mouthpiece is going to be a good choice.

Will A Snoring Mouthpiece Work For Everyone?

You’re probably wondering if the snoring mouthpiece is 100% effective. While I have had great success using one myself as well as several close friends and family members that I recommended them to, a mouthpiece may not be the solution for everyone. While effectiveness seems to vary from one study to another, they seem to be effective somewhere between 80% and 90% of cases, which is higher than any other snoring solution out there. In fact, no other anti-snoring product has been studied nearly as much as the snoring mouthpiece. Physicians have known about their effectiveness since the 1980’s.

If you tried the test above and did not have success, it’s possible that a mouth guard still may work. There are numerous products out there that are offered on a “no risk” basis with a 30-day trial. In most cases, if the mouthpiece doesn’t work, you may simply ship it back for a full refund.

 

 

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Several years ago, I heard about how Mandibular Advancement Devices can help with a snoring problem. I quickly realized that owning a custom-made mouthpiece that’s created by a dentist was cost prohibitive. This led me to search for a Do-It-Yourself type guard and it wasn’t long before I discovered that a self-molded product does, in […] Read more

Is It FDA Approved or FDA Cleared?

While learning about snoring mouthpieces, you have probably seen advertisements stating that a product is “FDA approved” or “FDA cleared”. Technically speaking, the FDA doesn’t necessarily approve any mouthpieces. While this term is often used loosely by advertisers, “FDA Approved” wording is actually prohibited from being used all together. Most sellers unknowingly use this term in lieu of the correct term which is actually FDA cleared.

However, not just anyone can receive FDA clearance. There’s a certain process that must be followed in order to obtain this badge.

Manufacturers are typically required to register their device and submit a premarket notification 510(k).  Snoring mouthpieces are considered a class II medical device and are typically cleared by the FDA on the basis of being substantially equivalent to a product that is similar and has already received clearance.  Once FDA clearance is obtained, the manufacturer can sell their product and use the term “FDA Cleared” in their marketing.

Why is Being FDA Cleared So Important?

What’s the significance of choosing a product that has been cleared by the FDA? Does it really matter if a mouthpiece is FDA cleared?

The FDA is responsible for protecting public health and safety. Mandibular Advancement Devices, such as the snoring mouthpiece are considered class 2 devices and are regulated by the FDA. There is an application process that must be followed before bringing a product to market. The manufacturer must submit information to the FDA which is carefully examined before a determination is made. If the FDA gives the manufacturer the green light, they are then able to sell their product to the public.

If you purchase a product that has not been cleared by the FDA, you will never know if the mouthpiece that you put inside of your mouth each night is made from a medical grade plastic and it may even contain toxins. You will be spending several hours each night wearing your mouthpiece, so you probably want to ensure that the mouthguard that you are using has been carefully examined by an agency such as the FDA. In countries outside of the US, agencies such as the European Commission and Australian Register of Therapeutic Goods serve a similar purpose as the FDA.

How Do You Ensure That A Mouthpiece Is FDA Cleared?

When shopping for a mouthpiece, you see if the words “FDA Cleared” are written within an ad. Do you stop there and take their word for it? Probably not. Before making a decision it’s a good idea to search the FDA Establishment Registration and Device listing database. First, try searching for the brand. If you are unable to locate a match, try searching the database for the manufacturer’s name.  If you are still not able to locate a product, email the company and ask them to provide their registration number which is typically 10 digits in length.

Before being able to purchase a snoring mouthpiece, you actually must obtain a prescription from a physician. In many cases, getting a prescription is rather simple and can actually be accomplished by answering a few screening questions prior to being able to complete the purchase. If these questions are answered correctly, you can proceed with the transaction. In a case where the questions were not answered to satisfaction, you will not be able to proceed.

With every mouthpiece sold in the US, a prescription must be generated.

One clue as to whether or not a product is a registered device is to look for a questionnaire when checking out. If one does not appear before the final checkout, it’s likely not a US registered product.

Choosing a product that has been cleared by the FDA is one of many items that you should consider before making a buying decision. There are a number of other factors to consider. Take some time reading product reviews in order to familiarize yourself with what’s available.

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Is It FDA Approved or FDA Cleared? While learning about snoring mouthpieces, you have probably seen advertisements stating that a product is “FDA approved” or “FDA cleared”. Technically speaking, the FDA doesn’t necessarily approve any mouthpieces. While this term is often used loosely by advertisers, “FDA Approved” wording is actually prohibited from being used all together. […] Read more

Snoring & Sleep Apnea – How is it Causing my Child to Snore?

Common Reasons Why Children Snore

There are many reasons why infants and children snore.  Most of the time, children snore because of congestion from a cold or infection, however, snoring may be an indicator of a more serious condition such as sleep apnea.  Whatever the case may be, stopping the snoring should be a priority for parents.  The first step should be alerting and visiting your doctor or pediatrician.  Children who snore can experience life-altering side effects from snoring such as growth halts, behavioral issues, and having a weakened immune system.  Let’s get to the bottom of how it all starts.

Enlarged Tonsils

Enlarged tonsils and adenoids are 2 of the most common reasons infants and children snore.  The tonsils are located in the back of your mouth on either side.  They fight infection and filter out microscopic germs.  Many children are repeatedly diagnosed with strep throat in their younger years and strep can cause the tonsils to enlarge, get red, and make an already sore throat even more painful.  When the tonsils enlarge, they block the flow of air down the airway, which creates the soft tissues in the throat to vibrate, since the air is forcing its way through the passageway.  The sound of these fatty tissues vibrating is known as the sound of snoring.  It’s common for children, of all ages, to snore when they are sick, not just because they are congested, but due to inflammation that may be occurring in the tonsils and adenoids.

Enlarged Adenoids

Adenoids are soft tissues located behind the nasal cavity.  They, like the tonsils, act as a filter in the body and catch germs that may be inhaled before they enter the body.  If the adenoids are working overtime to fight off an infection, the adenoids may swell slightly.  If swelling occurs, they may block the flow of air down the throat through the nose.  If there is a blockage in the airway, snoring commonly occurs.

Children Who Are at Risk of Sleep Apnea

If your child does not have an infection or illness, it’s possible that the snoring is coming from a more serious condition called sleep apnea.  Sleep apnea occurs during the night when your body momentarily stops breathing and there is no oxygen entering your body.  Snoring is one of the most common indicators of sleep apnea.  There are several risks of developing sleep apnea in children who are obese, have unusually small jaws, have down syndrome, are between the ages of 2-6.

Obese Children

Children that are obese may snore as a side effect of sleep apnea.  When you are obese, at any age, you can develop extra fatty tissues in the neck and throat.  The extra tissues block the entryway for air to pass into the lungs, thus limiting oxygen into the body and brain.  A study from 2010 suggested that 46% of obese children were diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea.

Those with small jaws

Small and petite children can often have a smaller frame and bone structures than other children.  If a child’s jaw is very small, the tongue can recede into the back of the throat farther than usual during the night.  If this occurs, it can create a blockage in the airway.  The back of the throat where the tongue relaxes is the most common area of airway blockage with people who have sleep apnea.

Children with Down Syndrome

Children with Down Syndrome are 60% more likely to develop and be diagnosed with sleep apnea.  The reason is simply based on the anatomy of children who have Down Syndrome.  Typically these children lack muscle tone in the mouth and throat, which leaves flabby, fatty tissues lining the throat.  These tissues can create an airway blockage and also produce a loud sounding snore.

Children between the ages of 2 and 6

Children who are between the ages of 2 and 6 are more at risk of snoring.  This is mainly due to the fact that children in this age range typically start daycare or school and are more susceptible to germs and illnesses nearby.  The more they are exposed to germs and viruses, the more likely they are to get sick and experience inflammation in the nose and throat which will cause snoring.

How Sleep Apnea and Snoring Can Effect Children

Raising children can be difficult and problematic enough as it is, but throwing in the side effects of having sleep apnea from your little one can be even more stressful.

Extreme Daytime Drowsiness

Your child may experience extreme tiredness throughout the day, which can lead to an unpleasant day for the parents and child.  When you experience sleep apnea and constant snoring throughout the night, your brain does not receive the correct amount of oxygen that provides a solid night’s sleep.  Instead, you wake up hundreds of times throughout the night, usually completely unaware due to falling immediately back to sleep, and your body does not fully rest.

Snoring

Snoring is the most common side effect of sleep apnea.  When the airway is blocked in the back of your throat, the tissues in your mouth start to vibrate.  When the vibration occurs, the sound of snoring begins.  The more fatty tissues that line your throat and mouth, the louder the sound of snoring.

Behavioral Problems

Behavioral issues can also occur in children who experience sleep apnea.  This can also relate to the child not getting enough sleep and they can be grumpy and difficult to deal with.  More serious behavioral problems can also occur because children need oxygen in order to continue to grow into healthy adolescents and adults.  If oxygen is deprived to the brain constantly and goes unnoticed for months or years, this can impact their ability to learn, act, and associate with peers and adults.

Sleeping in awkward Positions

Many children who snore or have sleep apnea often sleep in very awkward positions.  This may be due to the fact that their body is subconsciously positioning the neck back so that air can flow down their airway.  When a child wakes up in the middle of the night due to sleep apnea and tries to gasp for air, they may toss and turn into a weird sleeping position and then immediately fall back asleep, most of the time not even realizing they woke up.

Wetting the Bed

If your child is potty trained and unexpectedly wets the bed, it may be a sign they have sleep apnea.  Oxygen is cut off from the brain when a child has sleep apnea and lack of oxygen can stop or halt certain neurological impulses that control body functions.  In this case, the impulse that triggers the child that they need to use the restroom could be misfiring, resulting in the child wetting the bed.

Weak Immune System

Snoring and sleep apnea prohibit children and adults from getting a good night’s sleep.  This can be extremely detrimental to the immune system and cause it to weaken.  Children need their sleep in order to stay healthy and if they have sleep apnea or snore on a regular basis, this could lead to a chronic history of infections and viruses.

Halt or Impact Growth

Alongside a weakened immune system, children can also experience a delay in growth if they have sleep apnea.  Oxygen is critical to keep the body healthy and grow during a child’s youth.  Sleep apnea prohibits the child from a steady flow of oxygen during sleep and this can significantly halt growth spurts and physical and mental development.

What to do if my child has sleep apnea?

If your child snores and you are wondering if sleep apnea is the culprit, there are several things you can do.

Go to your doctor

First and foremost, go visit your doctor or pediatrician immediately.  It’s a small price to pay in order to keep your child’s health and development in check.

Consult your ENT doctor

If you think you need a second opinion, consult an ENT doctor.  They can shed more light on the specifics of how and why your child snores.  They can provide details on the anatomy of your child’s throat and if there is any evidence of inflammation or infection that might be blocking the flow of air.  It’s possible that a deviated septum in the nose may also be blocking the intake of air through the nasal cavity.

Ask for a sleep study

It’s not uncommon for children and adults to undergo a sleep study.  In fact, sleep studies can now be performed in the comfort of your own home.  This option may be a better fit for your child because you can administer the study in their crib or bed at home instead of scaring them with an overnight stay at a sleep study center.  These studies have come a long way in recent years and many simply involve wearing a finger clip monitor and a few discrete sensors.

Treatments for children with sleep apnea

There are several ways to treat children with sleep apnea and your child’s physician will suggest the option that is right for you and your child.  The most common treatments for children with sleep apnea include:

  • Tonsillectomy
  • Adenoidectomy
  • Weightloss
  • CPAP treatment

It’s crucial to take action as soon as you witness your child snoring.  The reason may be as simple as them having a cold or respiratory infection which is creating a temporary blockage in their throat.  However, it’s strongly encouraged to consult with your doctor to determine the underlying cause of the snoring, preventative measures to stop it, and an effective treatment plan if it does seem to continue.

 

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Snoring & Sleep Apnea – How is it Causing my Child to Snore? Common Reasons Why Children Snore There are many reasons why infants and children snore.  Most of the time, children snore because of congestion from a cold or infection, however, snoring may be an indicator of a more serious condition such as sleep […] Read more

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