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Couple in bed guy snoring woman covering ears with pillowDo I really snore? How can I tell if I snore? These are a couple questions that you may ask yourself if you suspect that you have a snoring problem.

Perhaps your bed partner or roommate is always complaining that your snoring disrupts their sleep. Maybe you are simply curious as to whether or not you snore. Whatever the reason, you want to get to the bottom of what goes on after your head hits the pillow and you fall asleep.

You’re not going to be able to figure out if you are snoring by yourself. You will need help from either a partner or technology.

How To Determine If I Snore

Ask Your Partner, Friend, or Family Member

The first and most obvious way to tell if you snore is to ask your partner to listen as you sleep. If your snoring is loud enough, they probably already informed you without having to ask. If you do snore, have them note the position in which you are sleeping and the intensity of your snoring. Be sure to also keep a journal of activities such as drinking alcohol or eating before bed which can impact snoring.

If you don’t have a bed partner, ask a close friend or family member to stay the night with you and observe you for the presence of snoring. While this may seem like an odd request, you will be glad you asked, especially if you find out that your snoring is a symptom of sleep apnea which is a serious condition that requires medical attention.

Enlist The Help of Technology

snoring appIf you are not able to find anyone willing to help you (or are too embarrassed), you can turn to technology to lend a hand.

Smartphones can be an excellent tool for identifying a snoring problem. There are a number of different apps, many that are free, which can listen for snoring and record it so that you can hear it the next day.

There are even specialized apps that are able to differentiate the sound of snoring from other bedroom noises. These specialized apps will often assign a score to your snoring which helps to quantify it. You can then take corrective action and compare the score from before and after.

Signs That You Are A Snorer

While there are only two ways to know for certain that you snore, there are a few daytime symptoms that you may notice which can offer a clue as to whether or not you snore.

Daytime Tiredness: The first sign that you may notice is daytime tiredness. No matter how many hours of sleep you get the night before, you are tired and sluggish upon rising in the morning.

Snoring can affect your quality of sleep, preventing you from achieving REM sleep which is necessary to rejuvenate the body and prepare it for the next day.

A Sore Throat In the Morning: Having a sore throat in the morning may suggest snoring may be present.

Most snorers sleep with their mouth open which allows air to pass through and dry out the mouth and airway. A dry mouth plus a uvula and soft palate that are tossed around as you snore are a recipe for a morning sore throat.

Difficulty Concentrating: As mentioned, snoring can disrupt your sleep patterns and lead to daytime sleepiness. Due to the body not getting enough deep sleep to refresh itself, you may also notice a decline in your ability to concentrate. Are you having difficulty focusing on what you are doing or have a short attention span? Snoring may be the cause.

Morning Headaches: Do you have an unexplained headache when you wake up in the morning. Does it frequently occur? Snoring may be to blame.

Snoring is caused by a restricted airway. If you are unable to breathe properly at night, carbon dioxide builds up in the blood and affects the nervous system. This, in turn, can cause headaches in the morning. Morning headaches may also strongly suggest that sleep apnea is present.

What To Do If I Snore?

Snoring, in its benign form, can be harmless although disturbing your partner’s sleep is an issue that should be addressed.

Snoring that’s related to sleep apnea should be addressed by a medical specialist who can treat this condition.

Telling the difference between snoring itself and snoring as a sign of sleep apnea should be left up to a medical professional who is trained in sleep medicine.

Once you are certain that your snoring is not related to Obstructive Sleep Apnea, there are a few remedies that you can try.

First, avoid alcohol and sedatives before going to bed which can worsen snoring.

Avoid sleeping on your back. Sleep on your side instead which will help to keep the airway free of obstruction.

If you are overweight, try losing weight which helps by reducing the amount of fat around the airway.

If snoring persists, you may want to consider the use of an oral appliance which can help by holding the jaw forward to help clear the airway and prevent the sound of snoring.

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Do I really snore? How can I tell if I snore? These are a couple questions that you may ask yourself if you suspect that you have a snoring problem. Perhaps your bed partner or roommate is always complaining that your snoring disrupts their sleep. Maybe you are simply curious as to whether or not you […] Read More

clock with a question markIf you are considering buying a snoring mouthpiece, you’re probably wondering how long it takes for it to work. Does it work the first night or will it take some time before you begin to see results?

Snoring mouthpieces typically work the first night which means for most, you can expect to see immediate results. In some cases, you may experience an adjustment period before you begin to see a reduction or elimination of snoring. Then, there are less common cases where a mouthpiece does not affect snoring. Here are a few reasons why a mouthpiece may not work immediately and a proposed solution.

Reasons Why A Snoring Mouthpiece May Not Work

Poor or Improper Fitting

The Problem: The most common reason why you may not see results the first night of use is due to a poor or improper fit.

Most mouthguards require a custom fitting which typically involves heating the unit and taking an impression of your teeth.

There are two reasons why this is done. First, a mouthguard that has been custom fitted will stay in position and not move around. Second, a properly fitted mouthguard will keep the jaw forward, which is an essential part of clearing the airway of breathing obstructions.

The Solution: If you suspect that your oral appliance is not working because of an improper fit, start by reviewing the fitting instructions that came with the packaging to ensure that it was molded properly.

One mistake often made with a boil and bite thermoplastic mouthpiece is not pushing the jaw out during the fitting. When correctly fitted, the lower teeth should be slightly in front of the upper. If not, the jaw is not properly advanced and snoring will continue.

Mouthpiece Falls Out While Asleep

The Problem: You wake up in the morning and find that your mouthpiece has fallen out and is laying next to your pillow. The issue, of course, is that the mouthpiece has to be inside of your mouth in order to work.

The Solution: There are a couple different possibilities here. First, the appliance that you chose may be too small or too large for your mouth. Some manufacturers offer different size appliances for different size mouths. For instance, women’s mouths are generally smaller than men’s, so they may require a scaled-down regular size mouthpiece. Several companies such as VitalSleep or Snoremeds offers different size options.

An improper fit will also cause a mouthpiece to fall out. Once again, ensure that it fits snugly and does not move around when inside of the mouth.

Sometimes, even a properly fitted mouthpiece will fall out at night if you tend to sleep with your mouth open. In this case, you may want to consider using an elastic chin strap along with your mouthpiece to hold the jaw closed and prevent the mouthpiece from falling out. Neoprene chinstraps can be purchased for less than $20 online.

Snoring Is Caused By Some Other Issue

The Problem: While snoring is almost always caused by a narrowed airway due to the jaw falling back, there are cases where a snoring mouthpiece may not be effective.

If your snoring originates from the sinuses, which is far less common than the airway, a mouthpiece that holds the jaw forward is not going to help. It’s possible that a nasal obstruction is causing your snoring.

The Solution: Try creating the sound of snoring while laying on your back. Next, move your jaw forward and see if the snoring sound becomes quiet or is eliminated. If you do not notice a difference in sound, your snoring may originate elsewhere. In such a case, it may be best to consult with a physician so they can determine the exact cause.

 

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If you are considering buying a snoring mouthpiece, you’re probably wondering how long it takes for it to work. Does it work the first night or will it take some time before you begin to see results? Snoring mouthpieces typically work the first night which means for most, you can expect to see immediate results. In […] Read More

What Is Blue Light And How Does It Effect Sleep?

Man laying in bed looking at smart phone in darkWhile laying in bed at night, you check your email, Facebook, Instagram, catch up on the latest episode of your favorite TV show or read an e-book. Is there really an issue using light emitting electronic devices before going to bed? Interestingly enough, the answer is “yes”.

Electronic devices such as our smartphones emit short wavelength enriched light. What does this mean and why is it important?

Scientists have been taking a closer look at the effects of blue light on sleep and have found that blue light exposure significantly impacts the sleep-inducing hormone called melatonin. In fact, it delays the production of melatonin more than twice as long as red light which is at the opposite end of the light spectrum.

As a result of blue light exposure, there is a disruption of circadian rhythm which is our internal regulator that cycles through night and day over a 24 hour period. Environmental factors, such as the presence or absence of light, regulate circadian rhythm. At night, our master clock (known as SCN) alerts the brain to produce more melatonin which makes us sleepy.

Blue light exposure at night causes a delay in our ability to fall asleep which reduces the total amount of sleep each night. Once asleep, the lack of melatonin can prevent us from reaching REM sleep, which refreshes and restores our bodies for the next day.

Simply stated, our body uses light to signal that it’s time to get up and do things while the absence of light signals the body that the day is over and it’s time to get some rest. The artificial light that comes from electronic devices tricks the brain into delaying the production of melatonin which in turn keeps us awake longer and prevents deep sleep.

It’s believed that melatonin suppression and lack of sleep can lead to several other issues such as obesity, type II diabetes, depression, and even cancer.

The effects of blue light do not stop there.

As we fall into a deeper sleep, our core body temperature begins to fall. It’s been scientifically proven that when exposed to blue light prior to bed, our body temperature does not drop as it does normally. On the other hand, those who were exposed to red light prior to falling asleep saw a normal drop in body temperature throughout the night.

Reducing Blue Light Exposure Prior To Bed

Blue light blocking glassesIn order to get the best night sleep possible, you should avoid exposure to blue light at least 2-3 hours prior to going to bed. The purpose of a bedroom is for sleeping, not catching up on your social media accounts. Make a habit of leaving your devices in another room to avoid the temptation of picking them up and reading. This also includes electronic readers.

If you must use blue light emitting devices late at night, consider trying a blue light filtering software which will help to reduce your exposure. Most recently made smartphones have such a filter built in, so all you need to do is turn it on. In other cases, you may need to download an app, which is often free.

Try replacing the lightbulbs in your bedroom with ones that are specifically made to reduce blue light wavelengths. LED light bulbs that give off warmer light are available at most hardware stores.

Other ways to reduce blue light exposure is to wear glasses that are specifically designed to block this spectrum of light. There are also filters which can be placed on your screen to reduce exposure. These filters are commonly used on computer screens.

Another way to reduce your exposure to blue light is to take a carotenoid supplement which aids your eyes in the ability to block blue light. Possible supplements may include Zeaxanthin and Lutein, both which can be found at your local drug store.

Should I Completely Avoid Blue Light?

While blue light should be avoided entirely at night, it can actually be helpful during the day, signaling the brain not to produce melatonin. In fact, it’s suggested that a half hour of blue light in the morning can improve alertness and improve memory.

Light exposure during the day is very important. In fact, those with circadian disorders are often prescribed light therapy. Natural sunlight is free and of course is the best source of light. There are also lamps which you place in front of you if sunlight is not available.

Those who live in the northern hemisphere often lack sun exposure which can lead to a circadian disorder, seasonal affective disorder, and even depression. For these people adding light therapy to the daily routine is important.

While light should be avoided at night, you should aim to get enough during the day.

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What Is Blue Light And How Does It Effect Sleep? While laying in bed at night, you check your email, Facebook, Instagram, catch up on the latest episode of your favorite TV show or read an e-book. Is there really an issue using light emitting electronic devices before going to bed? Interestingly enough, the answer […] Read More

Wife pulling covers off husband

We are a sleep-deprived nation. According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), 33% of us do not get enough sleep on a nightly basis. That’s 107 million out of 325 sleep-deprived individuals, in the United States.

There are a number of different reasons why we are getting less than 7-8 hours of sleep per night, as recommended by the CDC. Stress, room temperature, sleep disorders, work worries, financial troubles, and children are a few reasons why we fail to get enough shut-eye each night.

One of the most common reasons why married couples are sleep deprived has to do with their bed partner.

Couples often maintain different sleep schedules. Some enjoy staying up at night reading or watching television while others prefer going to bed early.

Then there are those who are early risers while their partner enjoys sleeping in. Early risers can wake their partners as they shower and get dressed before starting their day.

Snoring is yet another bedroom nuisance that’s more common than you may realize. It’s estimated that up to half of the population has a snoring problem. Snoring is an issue that can keep your partner up all night without you even realizing it.

It’s fairly easy to see how a bedroom partner can disrupt your sleep, but what does one do to reclaim a peaceful night of rest? Some are turning to sleep divorce as a solution, but is that really necessary? What is sleep divorce and how can it be prevented?

What is Sleep Divorce?

“Sleep Divorce” is a term that has been coined to describe separate sleeping arrangements for married couples. In lieu of divorcing their partner due to disruptive sleeping habits, the couple simply agrees to sleep separately so that their partner is not disturbed.

In many cases, couples end up sleeping in separate bedrooms, while this is not necessarily true in all cases. Some partners will agree to sleep in the same room but in separate beds. For instance, they may opt to use two separate twin size beds instead of a king size. Other times partners will sleep with dedicated covers but in the same bed.

Couple sleeping in two twin size bedsHow common is sleep divorce? You may be surprised to hear that an estimated 30% – 40% of couples choose to sleep independently. The reason why this statistic is so startling to some is that most couples who sleep separately often do not openly share this information with others.

While sleep divorce is not accepted as the norm today, it was very common over a century ago when some homes were built with separate sleeping quarters for him and her. Homebuilders today are noticing a trend where buyers are requesting joined master bedrooms.

There are a lot of opinions as to whether or not a sleep divorce is helpful or harmful to a relationship.

On one side of the argument, some believe that doing so will cause you to miss out on pillow talk and intimacy. Then there are those who argue that a sleep divorce will often save a relationship as some peoples’ bad bedroom habits are grounds for an actual divorce.

No matter which side of the argument you are on, most can agree that it’s best to avoid a sleep divorce if possible. How can this be accomplished?

How To Avoid Sleep Divorce

Before you throw in the towel and move to another bedroom, here are a few suggestions that you may want to try.

Get Checked Out 

If you are unable to sleep because your partner snores or moves around too much in bed, there may be an underlying medical issue that needs to be addressed.

Sleep disorders such as Restless Leg Syndrome, Obstructive Sleep Apnea, and Insomnia are just a few issues that may prevent the two of you from sleeping in harmony. Sleep Apnea alone affects over 20 million people with the majority (80%) being undiagnosed. Would you like to guess the number 1 symptom of sleep apnea? Yes, it’s snoring.

Make An Agreement 

Simply taking some time to talk things out and make an agreement may be all that it takes to restore your bedroom zen.

For instance, if your husband is an early riser and you like to sleep in, the two of you can agree that he uses a guest bathroom to get ready in the morning so that you can sleep without being disturbed.

If your partner enjoys watching television or reading at night, ask them if they can watch TV or read in another room and come to bed when they are prepared to sleep.

Maybe your partner goes to bed early and you are a night owl. Perhaps you both can agree on a bedtime somewhere in the middle?

Rethink Your Bed

Sometimes, environmental factors along with your partner’s habits can make sleeping next to them unbearable.

For instance, a bed that is too small or of poor quality can be an issue. Have a queen? Consider upgrading to a king. Sleeping on a standard spring mattress? Think about upgrading to a Posturepedic. A new mattress can mean the difference between feeling your partner’s every toss and turn to their movement going unnoticed.

Remove Electronics From The Bedroom

Both you and your partner can benefit from removing electronics from the bedroom such as TVs, phones or tablets.

Several studies have suggested a link between blue light (which emits from such electronic devices) and a disruption in sleep due to the suppression of melatonin.

It’s suggested that you should avoid blue light from screens 2-3 hours prior to falling asleep. If using electronic devices are absolutely necessary, consider blue-blocking glasses which will help to filter out blue light.

A Handy Solution For Snoring

Since snoring is the most common bedroom nuisance, it’s worth mentioning that snoring aids are available that can help.

One of my favorite products is the Snoring Mouthpiece, which is a device that fits inside of the mouth and is incredibly effective. If you want, you can read more here.

 

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We are a sleep-deprived nation. According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), 33% of us do not get enough sleep on a nightly basis. That’s 107 million out of 325 sleep-deprived individuals, in the United States. There are a number of different reasons why we are getting less than 7-8 hours of sleep per […] Read More

Snorelax is yet another anti-snoring product that has been recently introduced on crowdfunding websites such as Indiegogo or Kickstarter. Between the two sites, the company has raised over $183k in funds to launch their product. They are planning to start shipping the Snorelax as early as August 2018.

What Exactly Is Snorelax?

One Snorelax adhesive bandageIf you google the term “Snorelax”, Google will automatically show you results for the search term “Snorlax” (That’s Snorelax without the “e”). Here, you will find pages of information on a fictional character from the Pokémon cartoon, and not necessarily the snoring device.

Finding any information on the product requires that you click on the “Search instead for Snorelax” link which will direct you to the results for the product as it’s truly spelled.

Once you arrive at the correct search results page, you will not see a whole lot of information on this product or company aside from their Kickstarter campaign, a press release, and their official website which actually redirects you to their Indiegogo page.

Since I’ve never seen anything like it, I was intrigued and had to know more about what the company had to offer. Since their fundraising page was the only place that I was able to find information, I started my research there.

Perhaps the best way to describe the appearance of the SnoreLax is a cross between a large Band-aid and a jaw strap.

While it’s made from a 100% cotton material, it shares some of the same characteristics as Band-Aid because it has an adhesive backing which attaches to the face in two areas – below the cheekbone and under the chin.

It’s similar to a chin strap because the placement of the adhesive strip prevents the jaw from falling back, which in turn causes a narrowing of the airway. Chinstraps have been in existence for many years now and many have found them to be helpful when it comes to preventing snoring.

The Claim

snorelax claimsThe message that Snorelax delivers is straight-forward and simple. They believe that their product will allow you to wake up feeling energized, improve your health and in some cases, save your marriage.  Their product requires no maintenance, is non-invasive, is beard-friendly and allows you to sleep in any position.

The company claims that snoring is the third leading cause of divorce (although infidelity, financial issues, and lack of communication arguably rank among the top three). We do know that snoring can disrupt our partner’s sleep and lead to marital problems and perhaps divorce in some cases. It’s also known that snoring can be bad for your health.

While their Kickstarter page doesn’t offer any scientific evidence proving their product to be effective, they do suggest that their product was developed by “medical doctors” with combined medical experience of 65 years.

They do show a before and after MRI which illustrates a narrowed airway before using the Snorelax and after. There is a clear difference between the airway opening in the first and second image.

What’s The Cost of Snorelax?

Snorelax is currently in production, so it’s not available for sale to non-backers.

They are however offering “perks” to their backers which might give us some insight into how much these will sell for in the future.

For $29, you will receive a 30-night supply of Snorelax. For $55, you will double the amount that you receive to 60. The price per 30-day supply reduces as you purchase in volume.

At about $1 per day supply, it’s unlikely that the cost will exceed this amount as many will be hesitant to spend nearly $400 annually on an anti-snoring product. I would expect it to eventually sell for $30 or less for a 1 month supply.

My Thoughts On Snorelax

Snorelax is certainly interesting and is a one-of-a-kind stop product that captured my interest from the moment that I came across it online.

In the past, I have tried using chinstraps which wrap around the head and provide similar jaw lifting action. The results of such products varied. In some cases, they reduced my snoring while other times I could not tell a difference in the amount or intensity of my snoring.  Perhaps since the area that it targets is more focused, it will be more effective.

I’m however still not entirely sold on the science behind the Snorelax. Knowing the doctors behind the product or citing specific research showing a study that was conducted would be helpful.

Overall, for around $30, I believe this will be a product that’s worth trying, despite the lack of evidence. The cost is lower than most snoring devices, although the ongoing cost of using this product daily can become expensive.

I hope to review this product soon and will add the information that I find to this post.

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Snorelax is yet another anti-snoring product that has been recently introduced on crowdfunding websites such as Indiegogo or Kickstarter. Between the two sites, the company has raised over $183k in funds to launch their product. They are planning to start shipping the Snorelax as early as August 2018. What Exactly Is Snorelax? If you google the […] Read More

You snore, your father snores, his father snored and your great-grandfather snored. Everyone in your family snores, so it must be a genetic thing, right?

While we often blame genetics for gifting us undesirable traits, the truth is, genetics are not always to blame. This is especially true for those who snore. While hereditary factors are sometimes the cause of snoring, lifestyle choices are often a more likely culprit.

Let’s discuss the difference between snoring caused by genetics vs snoring caused by lifestyle choices. In other words, factors that are in your control vs those not in your control.

When Genetics Causes Snoring

The shape of your face, an airway anatomy or craniofacial abnormalities are some hereditary factors that can contribute to snoring.

For instance, a larger than average tongue can fall backward and cause an airway blockage which may result in snoring. The tongue is directly tied to the back of the throat and airway, which is the site where snoring most commonly occurs.

Those with retrognathia, better known as an overbite, are far more susceptible to snoring because their jaw is shifted back which causes a narrowing of the airway and ultimately snoring or sleep apnea. Retrognathia can sometimes be treated using braces or in some cases, surgery. The good news is that nearly anyone can undergo treatment including children and adults.

Abnormalities in the airway are genetic factors that can also be to blame for snoring. For instance, if you were simply born with an airway that is too small, a restriction of air will occur and snoring may result.

Having a large neck, (over 16.5″ for males) is another genetic factor that causes snoring. If the girth of your neck is larger than average due to being overweight, this would fall under lifestyle factors.

If you have any of these genetic factors, you are three times more likely to suffer from snoring than someone who does not have these abnormalities.

Lifestyle Factors That Influence Snoring

Guy with gut hanging over pantsObesity is by far the most common lifestyle factor that causes snoring. When overweight, fat has a tendency to accumulate around the neck which will place force on the airway and reduces the diameter of the windpipe. In some cases, it may even completely cut off your breathing while asleep (sleep apnea).

“But my whole family is overweight so it must be hereditary.”

While there are several theories as to whether or not genetics plays a role in obesity, most experts agree that environmental factors are more likely to cause one to be overweight. For instance, those who were brought up eating high fat, high calorie, processed foods will likely continue this learned behavior into adulthood and become overweight.

Does your diet consist of mostly vegetables, fruit, lean meat, beans, eggs, and nuts or does it consist of pizza, burgers, fried foods and enriched bread? If you answered yes to the ladder, there is room to improve your diet.

In addition to diet, ask yourself if you are exercising for at least 30 minutes per day. Thirty minutes of exercise can speed up your metabolism which will help to keep your weight in check.

Alcohol use and smoking are also common lifestyle factors that contribute to snoring.

Alcohol is a depressant which causes the muscles in your body to relax. Drinking alcohol before bed can cause the airway to relax which will restrict breathing and often result in snoring. Has your spouse every commented that your snoring worsens after a night of drinking alcohol?

Smoking causes swelling (inflammation) of the airway which will reduce its diameter and cause snoring. Smoke for cigarettes irritates the lining of the airway and causes tissue to swell.

Final Thoughts

While it’s easy to blame our snoring on genetic features, if you want to know the true reason behind your snoring, start by evaluating your lifestyle choices and make changes based on what you find. It’s quite possible that altering your lifestyle will cause a dramatic change in your snoring.

For some, a combination of both poor lifestyle choices along with genetic factors results in a snoring condition. Even if you are genetically predisposed to snoring, maintaining a healthy lifestyle may be just enough to tip the scales and prevent snoring.

Then there are those who practice healthy habits but simply inherited the curse of snoring. For these individuals, there are antisnoring products out there such as these which can provide relief from snoring. If you fall into this category, speak with your doctor who can evaluate your situation and offer treatment options.

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You snore, your father snores, his father snored and your great-grandfather snored. Everyone in your family snores, so it must be a genetic thing, right? While we often blame genetics for gifting us undesirable traits, the truth is, genetics are not always to blame. This is especially true for those who snore. While hereditary factors […] Read More

Thyme leaves laying next to thyme oiilEssential oils seem to be the latest craze when it comes to treating nearly every ailment.

Have a cold? There’s an essential oil for that. A headache? There’s an essential oil for that as well. Insomnia? You guessed it, there’s an essential oil that will cure that as well.

By some estimates, nearly half the adult population snores. Snoring can not only disrupt your partners’ sleep but may also increase your risk for cardiovascular disease and cause high blood pressure.

If you are dealing with a snoring problem, you will be relieved to know that there are several remedies that can put a snoring problem to rest, one of the least expensive and least invasive treatment options is Thyme essential oils.

Using Thyme Essential Oils To Treat Snoring

Do a quick search for essential oils for snoring and you will find a long list of oils that are supposedly a good choice for snoring. There are even several recipes that can be concocted from a blend of different oils.

While there are several oils to choose from, Thyme is often cited as one of the best essential oils for snoring. What exactly is Thyme? How is it used to treat snoring? Lastly, does it really stop snoring?

What is Thyme? 

Thyme is more than just an herb that is used in cooking; its magical properties can help fight infection, enhance mood, suppress a cough, and even prevent snoring.

Thyme is an easy-to-grow plant that is available in more than 350 different varieties and is known for its strong, yet unique taste and fragrance that is occasionally described as “overpowering” by some.

One of the reasons Thyme is used to cure snoring has to do with its known ability to support respiratory wellness. The herb is used by some to relieve upper respiratory issues such as bronchitis, sinusitis, and asthma. It’s even suggested that Thyme has antibacterial properties.

How To Use Thyme To Stop Snoring

Since snoring typically originates in the airway and Thyme is known to support respiratory wellness, it’s quite plausible that this herb may be effective at treating snoring.

If you are considering using Thyme for the treatment of snoring, there are a few things that you should know before giving it a try.

First, Thyme oil should not be applied directly to the skin by itself as it will cause skin irritation. You must first mix it with a carrier oil such as olive oil, Jojoba, Grapeseed oil, Marjoram Oil, or Coconut oil.

Avoid contact with the eyes, nose, and ears as the oil can irritate these sensitive areas.

If you are pregnant or have high blood pressure, you should first speak with your doctor before using Thyme or trying aromatherapy.

There are a couple ways in which Thyme can be used to treat snoring.

The first is by mixing it with a carrier oil and applying it to the wrist and the underside of your big toe upon retiring for the evening.

“Big Toe”, you say? Yes, this area is the reflex area for the neck, which happens to be the area in which snoring originates.

Another way to use this essential oil is by using a diffuser which will fill your bedroom with the scent of Thyme. Inhalation therapy is a popular delivery method for essential oils such as Thyme.

Does Thyme Really Help With Snoring?

Will using Thyme oil really help with snoring or is it really just snake oil?

Like any other snoring solution, it’s not going to help in 100% of cases. There will be instances where it has no effect.

There is, however, a community of essential oil users that swear by its effectiveness and claim that it has greatly reduced and in many cases eliminated snoring.

The only way to know for certain if Thyme oil will work is to pick some up and give it a try. A 4 oz vial typically costs less than $15, which is a small investment considering the cost of other anti-snoring products.

If you have tried essential oils such as Thyme and did not experience relief from your snoring, you may want to consider trying a mouthpiece that is specifically designed to stop snoring. Such devices have been studied and are proven effective at reducing or eliminating snoring. Here you will find more information on such products.

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Essential oils seem to be the latest craze when it comes to treating nearly every ailment. Have a cold? There’s an essential oil for that. A headache? There’s an essential oil for that as well. Insomnia? You guessed it, there’s an essential oil that will cure that as well. By some estimates, nearly half the […] Read More

Is snoring keeping your spouse up at night? Why are you able to sleep at night without being awoken by your own snoring? There’s actually an explanation for this and it has to do with your body’s nervous system.

The Reason Why You Don’t Hear Yourself Snore

man snoring in bed next to woman Your wife or husband reminds you every morning that your snoring kept them up all night. You find this difficult to believe as you have never heard yourself snore. You begin to wonder if you really do snore and if so, why can’t you hear your own snoring while asleep?

This mysterious phenomenon surely has to have an explanation, and it does.

While resting, your nervous system monitors hundreds of different signals in order to sustain life.  Regulating breathing and heart rate are two examples of some of the most important functions that the nervous system handles.

When the body rests, it’s also repairing and rebuilding itself. During this process, certain areas of the brain are momentarily deadened or deactivated. Our ability to hear sound is one function that lessens as we sleep.

In order to get rest and repair itself, the body is able to ignore the non-threatening sound of snoring. Without this capability, the most of us will spend our days sleep deprived.

Why then do we wake up to the sound of an alarm clock, a crying child or an intruder breaking in? Even while asleep, the brain is able to recognize sounds that are out of the ordinary and respond by waking up to evaluate whether or not a true threat is present. In other words, we are able to process sounds selectively while sleeping.

Is Snoring Really A Problem? 

Since you are unable to hear your snoring while asleep, does this mean your snoring is not a problem? Yes, snoring can still be a problem.

If your spouse is unable to fall asleep due to your snoring, they are losing sleep which means that they are waking up less rested which can lead to irritability, daytime tiredness and inability to focus.

Did you know that snoring has consistently ranked as the #1 bedroom nuisance? Over time, a partners snoring can drive them out of the bedroom and onto the couch or a separate bedroom. While sleeping in separate bedrooms was acceptable 200 years ago, it’s far less common today and can lead to marital problems.

The other issue with snoring has to do with your health. In some cases, the act of snoring is a harmless act with the exception of those who it may disturb. In other cases, snoring can be a sign of a more serious condition known as sleep apnea.

While only a doctor can tell you if your snoring is related to sleep apnea, all or some of the following symptoms may be present with sleep apnea:

  • Snoring
  • Breathing pauses and then resumes
  • Daytime sleepiness after resting for 8+ hours
  • Brain fog
  • High Blood Pressure
  • Dry mouth or headaches in the morning
  • Reoccuring awakening

If you suspect that you may have sleep apnea, speak with your doctor who can further evaluate your health.

How To Stop Snoring

If your snoring is keeping your significant other up while you remain sound asleep, you may want to consider reducing or eliminating your snoring.

First, give the basics a try.

Instead of sleeping on your back, try sleeping on your side. Many snorers are positional snorers, meaning they only sleep while on their back. By simply changing sleep positions, you may be able to reduce your snoring.

Avoid drinking alcohol before bed. Alcohol is a sedative which causes the airway to relax. A relaxed airway encourages snoring as breathing can become restricted.

If you are overweight, losing a few pounds can be helpful as it will reduce the amount of fat surrounding your airway. Excessive fat in the neck can places pressure on the airway causing a restriction and ultimately cause snoring.

Once you have tried these basics, you may want to consider a more aggressive snoring treatment option.

Snoring mouthpieces are simply a plastic mouthguard that fits into the mouth and holds the tongue, jaw or both forward in order to increase the diameter of the airway and allow for better breathing without snoring. They are fairly inexpensive and are available in a number of different designs.

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Is snoring keeping your spouse up at night? Why are you able to sleep at night without being awoken by your own snoring? There’s actually an explanation for this and it has to do with your body’s nervous system. The Reason Why You Don’t Hear Yourself Snore Your wife or husband reminds you every morning […] Read More

Salt Room used for salt therapy Salt Therapy, also known as Halotherapy (Halo, meaning salt in greek), has been in existence since the 18th century, although it wasn’t until 1843 that Polish physician Feliks Boczkowski made an interesting discovery which popularized this type of therapy.

Boczkowski observed that local salt miners experienced fewer respiratory issues and fewer cases of lung disease in comparison to non-miners.

Nearly a century later during World War II, it was discovered by Karal Hermann Spannagel that injured patients who were hiding in the salt caves to avoid heavy artillery attacks had experienced a noticeable improvement in their health.

When word of the benefits of salt therapy got out, it wasn’t long before the idea offering salt therapy to the public caught on across Europe, Germany and eventually the US. Facilities which mimicked salt caves were created and those who were interested could stop by for a session which costs approximately $40 USD. Today, Halotherapy is touted as a non-invasive drug-free treatment that claims to be a cure-all for many ailments.

The dry salt that is used in therapy is identical to that found in salt mines and is much more concentrated than sea salt that is found in the ocean air. In fact, cave salt is 10x – 15x stronger than sea salt, meaning that a 45-minute session in a salt room is the equivalent of 3 days of sea salt exposure.

Today, there are even machines that can be purchased and used in-home to recreate the same conditions of a salt mine. Machines such as the Salinetherapy Ultrasonic Salinizer, Salin Plus, CrystalLitez, WBM Himalayan Salt Lamp, Saltron, and Salitair can be purchased for $200 or less.

What Are The Health Benefits Of Salt Therapy?

It’s said that the microscopic salt particles offer numerous health benefits. A few of the benefits offered include reducing inflammation in the lungs, thinning out mucus and destroying microorganisms. Dry salt contains 84 elements as well as trace elements that are commonly found in the body.

It’s said that those with allergies, sinus congestion, asthma, bronchitis, snoring and even Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) may benefit from halotherapy.

In addition, it can also reduce headaches, stress, improve energy, detoxify the body, and fight off colds.

Those with skin conditions may also see some benefits. While salt can dehydrate skin, it contains other minerals that can rejuvenate skin and help with rashes, acne, psoriasis, and eczema.

Can Salt Therapy Help With Snoring?

Fat man snoring While there are no scientific studies making a direct connection between salt therapy and snoring, the known anti-inflammatory and mucus-thinning properties of Halotherapy could be beneficial to some who have a snoring problem, depending upon the type of snorer they are.

Snoring originates in one of two areas – the throat or nasal passages.

Those who experience snoring due to narrow nasal passages are referred to as nasal snorers. Narrowing can occur for a number of reasons, inflammation due to allergies being one of them.

For nasal snorers, salt therapy can help to relieve congestion and inflammation by moistening the nasal passages while thinning thick mucus.

Mouth snorers, on the other hand, are by far more common than nasal snorers. With mouth snorers, the airway becomes restricted and tissues collide with each other generating the sound of snoring.

In other words, in order to know whether or not you may benefit from Halotherapy, you need to determine which type of snorer you are.

How To Tell If You Are A Nasal Snorer or Mouth Snorer

Determining exactly where your snoring originates is not always easy. Here’s a simple test that you can try at home to give you an idea.

Give this a try:

  • While lying on your back, create the sound of snoring
  • Continue the sound of snoring while holding your jaw a few millimeters forward
  • Listen for any changes in the sound or intensity of your snoring

If the sound of snoring diminishes or stops when you move your jaw forward, there is a very good chance that your snoring originates from the throat. Probably 90% of snorers experience snoring that originates from the throat.

If there is no noticeable difference in sound when holding your jaw forward, there’s a good chance that you are a nasal snorer.

Is Halotherapy Worth Trying?

Salt therapy is certainly interesting and can be useful in treating some ailments such as snoring. However since the majority of snorers are experiencing snoring that originates from the airway, such treatment is unlikely to help the majority of snorers.

If you are certain that you are a nasal snorer, it may be worth giving Halotherapy a try.

For most snorers, an oral appliance will be a better choice as it targets the most common area of snoring which is the throat. Here you can find plenty of information on all of the over-the-counter mouthpieces that are available.

As always, consult with your doctor first before trying to treat snoring or any other condition with salt therapy.

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Salt Therapy, also known as Halotherapy (Halo, meaning salt in greek), has been in existence since the 18th century, although it wasn’t until 1843 that Polish physician Feliks Boczkowski made an interesting discovery which popularized this type of therapy. Boczkowski observed that local salt miners experienced fewer respiratory issues and fewer cases of lung disease in comparison […] Read More

You may have noticed that there appears to be a relationship between being overweight and snoring. As our weight increases, the sound of snoring also tends to increase. Snoring can be exasperated when sedatives such as alcohol are used.

You may be asking yourself “Why is this the case and will I stop snoring if I were to lose weight?”

Will Losing Weight Stop My Snoring?

The most common cause of snoring can be attributed to carrying excessive fat in the neck area. Men with a neck circumference greater than 17″ and women with a circumference greater than 16″ are at higher risk of being a snorer and possibly developing Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

The neck is one of the many areas that we carry extra fat. Unfortunately, this is also the area in which air travels from the nose to your lungs through the airway. With extra fat surrounding the airway, pressure is exerted when we lay down. This pressure can squeeze the airway, causing a restriction. When a restriction occurs, the lining of the airway will vibrate against itself resulting in the sound of snoring.

Does this mean that only overweight people snore? No, although there is an undeniable correlation between the two.

There are actually other reasons why a person who is not overweight may snore, such as a having a nasal obstruction, deviated septum, or simply due to the anatomy of their airway.

Nonetheless, if you are overweight and have developed a snoring problem, simply losing weight might be enough to stop your snoring.

How Can I Tell If Losing Weight Will Help?

So you decided that carrying extra fat may be the cause of your snoring. How can you be certain that losing weight will solve your snoring problem?

While it would be nice to know the answer to this question, it’s actually not possible to know for sure until you give it a try.

It’s entirely possible that weight loss may not remedy your snoring problem. There are however several health benefits that you will gain from loss of weight including:

  • Higher quality of sleep
  • Less stress on joints
  • Lower Blood pressure
  • Improved mood
  • Lower risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes
  • Increased energy

Even if weight loss doesn’t stop your snoring, you will look better and feel better as a result of your efforts.

How Much Weight Do I Need to Lose To See Results?

Are you considering weight loss as a means to stop snoring but don’t know where to set your weight loss goal?

You may be surprised to hear that losing only 10 lbs may be enough to notice a difference in snoring. Some experts suggest using roughly 5% of your body weight as a starting point.

Ultimately, you should aim for a BMI in the normal range which is less than 24.9%. There are several online calculators that can help to determine your BMI.

If you lose a few pounds and notice a reduction in snoring, you may decide to continue on with your weight loss journey until your snoring is eliminated.

What Else Can I Do to Stop Snoring?

You may have decided to combat your snoring with weight loss, but this can take several months. What do you do in the meantime to stop your snoring?

There are several snoring solutions available, some are more effective than others.

The easiest way to reduce snoring is to try sleeping on your side. If you are not able to remain on your side throughout the night, there are several “bumper” style products that can assist or simply fastening a couple tennis balls to the back of a nightshirt will do the trick.

Positional snoring is very common and sleeping on one’s side can relieve pressure that’s placed against the airway by extra fat.

Using a snoring mouthpiece can also effectively stop snoring. These mouthguards are placed inside of the mouth and hold the jaw forward, which helps to prevent airway collapse.

 

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You may have noticed that there appears to be a relationship between being overweight and snoring. As our weight increases, the sound of snoring also tends to increase. Snoring can be exasperated when sedatives such as alcohol are used. You may be asking yourself “Why is this the case and will I stop snoring if I […] Read More

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